The trash vortex | Greenpeace Australia Pacific

AMAZING article by Greenpeace Australia.
All about the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. It is a trash pile the size of Texas or Turkey! If we all just do a little, it will make the world of difference. Literally. It’s time we did something about it.
Read away!

Plastic is displayed on a beach and the word Trash is spelt out from golf balls. The wide variety of items shown in this image highlight the diverse range of sources from which the plastics in our oceans originate. This is part of the Ocean Defenders Campaign in which the Greenpeace ship Esperanza MV sails to the Pacific Ocean, sometimes referred to as the North Pacific garbage patch, to document the threat that plastic poses to the environment and sea life.

Plastic is displayed on a beach and the word Trash is spelt out from golf balls. The wide variety of items shown in this image highlight the diverse range of sources from which the plastics in our oceans originate. This is part of the Ocean Defenders Campaign in which the Greenpeace ship Esperanza MV sails to the Pacific Ocean, sometimes referred to as the North Pacific garbage patch, to document the threat that plastic poses to the environment and sea life.

The trash vortex is an area the size of Texas in the North Pacific in which an estimated six kilos of plastic for every kilo of natural plankton, along with other slow degrading garbage, swirls slowly around like a clock, choked with dead fish, marine mam

Source: The trash vortex | Greenpeace Australia Pacific

Do you sea what I sea?

“Hello Poly… Well Hello Poly.”

Polyethylene that is.

It’s everywhere. All through our oceans and all across our land.

I hear you saying “well what can I do about it?”

Everything. 

The future is LITERALLY in our hands.

So… What do you think? Leave a comment below and tell us your thoughts?

– Do You Really Need That Drastic Bag?

 Image from Planet Earth Herald

17 GIFS that perfectly capture the supermarket experience

When you arrive at peak hour
newplague

And somebody throws out a plastic bag before they’ve even left the store
yousuck

Before biting into a Chomp. Apparently they needed that bag for a 6 second trip.
tacky

When you check to see if you remembered your reusable bag
thanksforcoming

And then the first person you see is someone you can’t stand, so you keep your earphones in.
fakesmilenow

When people insist on walking side by side, so you have to spiderman the shelf to pass them
pandatrolley

So you make your way past the deli meats
z-hot-dogs-face

And then you run into that first person again
godiwannamurderyou

You get all your items in record time
elaine

And there’s an empty line at the self check-out
IMG_5537

But you notice the guy to your left is piling up his groceries in plastic bags
face

And uses a whole bag just for milk
thatisstupid

He looks at you all like “No, but I need these”
coolmotivestillmurder

But you learnt about Environmental Sustainability in your Arts core
a4e2abd0-1787-0133-462c-0a2ca390b447

And as you look the other way, you see tartan-trolley-lady packing her groceries in her own bags
iloveyou

And know that the two of you are cooler than one-bag-milk-guy
sitwithus

He tries one more time to make excuses
sweatpants

So you turn and give him one last goodbye
keepthechange

And ride off into the sunset with tartan-trolley-lady
sethjames

Do the light thing.

Screen Shot 2015-09-21 at 2.12.17 pm

A group of South African entrepreneurs are taking plastic bags and refashioning them into solar powered backpacks designed to give children light to study with.

The plastic bags are cleaned and turned into a textile-like material. They then sew the material into backpacks, and add a small, removable solar charger, which collects power as the kids walk home.

The chargers can be easily removed and screwed onto lamps made from mason jars. They then provide six to nine hours of light, crucial for studying if the kids are among the 1.3 billion people worldwide without regular access to electricity.

If only this was the last straw.

Marine biologists on a research trip in Costa Rica have pulled a struggling sea turtle out of the water, only to find its nostril blocked by a plastic straw. Debating whether or not to interfere with the poor wild animal for fear of legal ramifications, the biologists persisted and removed it completely. The turtle clearly did not like the procedure, but hopefully now it can breathe a little more freely. This is no ones fault but ours.

Plastic is drastic.


For more information, visit:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/wildlife/11803600/Plastic-straw-removed-from-turtles-nose-by-marine-biologists-in-heartbreaking-video.html

NO MORE DRASTIC BAGS!

COME ONE, COME ALL AND WELCOME!

Here at Drastic Bag, we’re all committed and ready to put an end to the unnecessary destruction caused by the single-use supermarket drastic bag. So open your eyes, take the first step and ask yourself.

Do you really need that drastic bag?
You hold the answer.